Personal Essays, Reviews, & Journalism

The New York Times: Questioning Gender Amid a Chaotic East Village Childhood

Those of us who were raised the only child of a single parent know how intense the relationship can be. Different days you may play the role of child, parent, sibling or emotional crutch — some days all at once. As you get through it, you try to find space for yourself, to become someone outside the all-enveloping world that your parent has provided. This is the main struggle driving iO Tillett Wright’s debut memoir, “Darling Days.”

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Psychology Today: Love Beyond Gender

It's a universal truth that relationships take work, but there's little precedent for what that work may involve when one's partner comes out as transgender. For couples who remain together through a gender transition, it can provoke a complicated reckoning with just how much—and who—has to change.

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Dame Magazine: My Life As A Reluctant Outlier

As the daughter of a gay man in the 1970s and ’80s I learned how to pass early in my life. I observed that, by behaving in certain ways and omitting certain details of my home life from casual conversation with kids and their parents, they might think I was like them. 

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Triquarterly: Marble-heavy, a bag full of God

I was nineteen years old when I first read Sylvia Plath’s poem Daddy. I was studying, my junior year abroad, sitting on my bed in a drafty chambre de bonne in the west end of Paris, when I hungrily opened a letter from my dad and discovered, on the back, the faint photocopied poem...

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Boston Globe: Review of "Let the Tornado Come"

In his 1950 novel, “Requiem for a Nun,” William Faulkner famously wrote, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” Rita Zoey Chin, in the prologue to “Let the Tornado Come,” her often devastating debut memoir, describes this idea in another way: “[A]s resounding and complete as any present moment is, one side of it is always touching, even in the gentlest of ways, the past, where there is always a story inside the story waiting to be told.”

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The Boston Globe: ‘New Life, No Instructions’ by Gail Caldwell

In her third and latest memoir, “New Life, No Instructions,” Gail Caldwell offers the kind of wisdom and grace you’d wish a friend, sister, or mother might deliver when you’re circling the drain. “Any change that matters, or takes,” she explains, “begins as immeasurably small. Then it accumulates, moss on stone, and after a few thousand years of not interfering, you have a glen, or a waterfall, or a field of hope where sorrow used to be.”

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The New York Times: A Life in Pieces

Which feels more true: a memoir told in fits and starts, stutters and sighs, a blend of sensual details and analytic asides? Or one that hews to the conventions of narrative with a beginning, middle and end? All memoirists know order is a contrivance, but readers also rely on the writer to create art by organizing the mess of life...

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The Atlantic: Interview with "Fun Home" author, Alison Bechdel

When cartoonist Alison Bechdel published Fun Home in 2006, it made nearly every best-of-the-year list. Her story of growing up lesbian in small-town Pennsylvania with a closeted gay father forever restoring his Victorian funeral home (a.k.a. the “Fun Home”) was praised for its ability to push the boundaries of both memoir and graphic novel. 

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Marie-Claire: Letting Him Go

When I bumped into Jeff at a friend's birthday party, I noticed how he went out of his way to introduce himself, and how, later, his large blue eyes lingered on me as he walked out into the cold New York night. I'd just turned 29 and had spent most of the past decade breaking up and reuniting with Jason, a Bradley Cooper look-alike whose laconic moodiness I confused with depth. Newly single, I asked Jeff out..

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Real Simple: I Don't Know How to Love You

Within the past year, my husband and I stopped showing up in the many drawings and cards our five-year-old daughter, Annabel, brought home from school. Instead nearly every creation was made for him: her “baby”; her “cutie boy”; her brother, Finn.

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